Ther is a story about a Greek philosopher, Athenian, I believe, who decided to run for office. As he walked around the Agora he engaged in conversations with some of the men who would be voting and asked them what they knew about any of the candidates. He specifically mentioned his own name, without identifying himself, and listened carefully to the opinions offered. The consensus was that the philosopher, because he was choosing to run for office, was probably not a good person and shouldn’t be supported. When it came time to voide, the philosopher decided not to vote for himself.

In other words, we might consider drafting people for high office, or specifically seeking out the most humble, modest and self-effacing with the distinct hope that having power will not go to their heads or at least not take control of their tongues.

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Veteran Cat Servant

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Daphne Macklin

Daphne Macklin

Veteran Cat Servant

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